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American Chemical Society

Electronic Conductivity, Ferrimagnetic Ordering, and Reductive Insertion Mediated by Organic Mixed-Valence in a Ferric Semiquinoid Metal–Organic Framework

Overview of attention for article published in Journal of the American Chemical Society, December 2015
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Title
Electronic Conductivity, Ferrimagnetic Ordering, and Reductive Insertion Mediated by Organic Mixed-Valence in a Ferric Semiquinoid Metal–Organic Framework
Published in
Journal of the American Chemical Society, December 2015
DOI 10.1021/jacs.5b10385
Pubmed ID
Authors

Lucy E. Darago, Michael L. Aubrey, Chung Jui Yu, Miguel I. Gonzalez, Jeffrey R. Long

Abstract

A three-dimensional network solid composed of Fe(III) centers and paramagnetic semiquinoid linkers, (NBu4)2Fe(III)2(dhbq)3 (dhbq(2-/3-) = 2,5-dioxidobenzoquinone/1,2-dioxido-4,5-semiquinone), is shown to exhibit a conductivity of 0.16 ± 0.01 S/cm at 298 K, one of the highest values yet observed for a metal-organic framework. The origin of this electronic conductivity is determined to be ligand mixed-valency, which is characterized using a suite of spectroscopic techniques, slow-scan cyclic voltammetry, and variable-temperature conductivity and magnetic susceptibility measurements. Importantly, UV-Vis-NIR diffuse reflectance measurements reveal the first observation of Robin-Day Class II/III mixed valency in a metal-organic framework. Pursuit of stoichiometric control over the ligand redox states resulted in synthesis of the reduced framework material Na0.9(NBu4)1.8Fe(III)2(dhbq)3. Differences in electronic conductivity and magnetic ordering temperature between the two compounds are investigated and correlated to the relative ratio of the two different ligand redox states. Overall, the transition metal-semiquinoid system is established as a particularly promising scaffold for achieving tunable long-range electronic communication in metal-organic frameworks.

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Mendeley readers

The data shown below were compiled from readership statistics for 289 Mendeley readers of this research output. Click here to see the associated Mendeley record.

Geographical breakdown

Country Count As %
United Kingdom 1 <1%
Japan 1 <1%
United States 1 <1%
Australia 1 <1%
Unknown 285 99%

Demographic breakdown

Readers by professional status Count As %
Student > Ph. D. Student 75 26%
Researcher 39 13%
Student > Master 29 10%
Student > Bachelor 22 8%
Student > Doctoral Student 14 5%
Other 46 16%
Unknown 64 22%
Readers by discipline Count As %
Chemistry 157 54%
Materials Science 19 7%
Physics and Astronomy 7 2%
Chemical Engineering 7 2%
Engineering 6 2%
Other 12 4%
Unknown 81 28%
Attention Score in Context

Attention Score in Context

This research output has an Altmetric Attention Score of 1. This is our high-level measure of the quality and quantity of online attention that it has received. This Attention Score, as well as the ranking and number of research outputs shown below, was calculated when the research output was last mentioned on 08 December 2015.
All research outputs
#18,431,664
of 22,834,308 outputs
Outputs from Journal of the American Chemical Society
#58,578
of 62,031 outputs
Outputs of similar age
#280,337
of 388,302 outputs
Outputs of similar age from Journal of the American Chemical Society
#332
of 401 outputs
Altmetric has tracked 22,834,308 research outputs across all sources so far. This one is in the 11th percentile – i.e., 11% of other outputs scored the same or lower than it.
So far Altmetric has tracked 62,031 research outputs from this source. They typically receive a little more attention than average, with a mean Attention Score of 6.8. This one is in the 2nd percentile – i.e., 2% of its peers scored the same or lower than it.
Older research outputs will score higher simply because they've had more time to accumulate mentions. To account for age we can compare this Altmetric Attention Score to the 388,302 tracked outputs that were published within six weeks on either side of this one in any source. This one is in the 16th percentile – i.e., 16% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.
We're also able to compare this research output to 401 others from the same source and published within six weeks on either side of this one. This one is in the 9th percentile – i.e., 9% of its contemporaries scored the same or lower than it.